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Chapter 5 March 14, 2009

Chapter 5 is titled Research. The main reasons for using research are:

  • to achieve credibility with management
  • to define audiences and segment publics
  • to formulate strategy
  • to test messages
  • to help management keep in touch
  • to prevent crises
  • to monitor competition
  • to sway public opinion
  • to generate publicity
  • to measure success

Research is done primarily and secondary. Primary research is directed to answer a specific question. Some examples of primary research are in-depth interviews, focus groups, surveys, and polls. Secondary research uses existing information, such as databases, books, and magazine articles. There is also qualitative and quantitative research.

Another important part of research is how to construct questions. There are a number of ways to create a questionnaire that is unbiased and politically correct.

All information is based off of the content from Public Relations: Strategies and Tactics (9th ed.) by Dennis L. Wilcox and Glen T. Cameron.

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Chapter 4

This chapter discusses the different departments and firms in PR. Some department names are corporate relations, marketing and corporate affairs, investor relations, public affairs, marketing communications, community relations, and external affairs. At the head of a department, there is usually a head executive called either a manager, vice president, or director. Each department is usually divided further into smaller sections.

Sources of friction is another topic in this chapter. Some sources of friction are:

  • legal issues
  • human resources
  • advertising
  • marketing

A PR firm provides many services. Some of these are marketing communications, media analysis, crisis communication, public affairs, and events management.

I also learned about how PR firms charge their clients. Some charge by the hour, some charge a monthly fee called a retainer fee, and others have a fixed project fee.

All information is based off of the content from Public Relations: Strategies and Tactics (9th ed.) by Dennis L. Wilcox and Glen T. Cameron.

 

Chapter 3

Chapter 3 discusses ethics and professionalism in public relations.

The three basic value orientations are

  1. absolutist-thinks every decision is either “right or wrong” regardless of the consequences
  2. existentialist-makes decisions based on the immediate practical choice
  3. situationalist-decisions are based on what would cause the least harm or the most good

The chapter also mentions ethical advocates professional organizations which set standards for ethical behavior.

One standard is giving gifts to journalists. Gifts to journalists can lessen their credibility if they are viewed as bribes.

All information is based off of the content from Public Relations: Strategies and Tactics (9th ed.) by Dennis L. Wilcox and Glen T. Cameron.

 

Chapter 1

The textbook I have for my Introduction to Public Relations is called “Public Relations: Strategies and Tactics. Chapter 1 is explaining the basics of Public Relations. Some of the main points are

  • the importance of building and maintaining mutually beneficial relationships
  • a process called RACE, which stands for Research, Action, Communication, and Evaluation
  • the differences between journalism, marketing, advertising, and PR
  • the importants of working with other departments in order to send out a constant message to the public
  • the different areas of PR, examples are corporations, nonprofits, entertainment, sports, politics, government, education, and international business
  • the five most important abilities a practitioner must posses: writing, research, planning, problem-solving, and business/economics
  • another point that interested me was the salary information. Most entry-level PR jobs range from $30,000 and $40,000
  • Generally, women earn less than men

All information is based off of the content from Public Relations: Strategies and Tactics (9th ed.) by Dennis L. Wilcox and Glen T. Cameron.

 

Chapter 2: The Evolution of PR February 4, 2009

In class the other day, we discussed the Evolution of Public Relations. I know more in detail about how Public Relations works, and was surprised to see how many well-known names from history have been intricately involved with Public Relations. I was interested to learn Public Relations was a practiced tool even during in ancient times. For example, Julius Caesar wrote a book in order to promote his goal in becoming the emperor of the Roman Empire. I also thought it was interesting to see how Public Relations played a role in the Boston Tea Party. “PRWeek has calledit ‘the greatest and best-known publicity stunt of all time.” Henry Ford used the two basic PR principles: positioning and being accessible to the press. I was suprised to see President Teddy Roosevelt was the first president to use news conferences and press conferences for public support. These days, those are both heavily relied on for any issue. It suprised me that he was the first to utilize them because those seem like they would’ve been around for hundreds of years. I would like to know more about aspects of women in Public Relations. I was concerned when I read that even though women dominate the Public Relations field, men still dominate the management levels. When I am in a career, I would like to know if I work hard enough and am successful in my endeavors, that my gender will not affect my placement in a management position. Overall, our class discussions were enlightening to me. I learned more than I thought I would by breaking off in groups and discussing the eras with classmates.

All information is based off of the content from Public Relations: Strategies and Tactics (9th ed.) by Dennis L. Wilcox and Glen T. Cameron.